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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Gail Collins, "Windsors Versus Weiner": Breaking Wind Over Weiner

"I am beginning to think a royal family might come in handy," Gail Collins candidly writes at the beginning of her latest New York Times op-ed entitled "Windsors Versus Weiner" (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/25/opinion/collins-windsors-versus-weiner.html?_r=0). Heck, she can no longer write about Romney's dog. Sex and crime have been monopolized by Maureen. So what's left? Eureka! Windsors and Weiner! They both begin with "W"!

And so, a new New York Times op-ed is born! Substance be damned!

Collins writes:

"Also, it appears that Weiner’s long speeches in Congress about the single-payer plan might also have been a kind of mating call. 'Your health care rants were a huge turn-on,' wrote the woman who reputedly talked dirty with him online."

Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn. But as long we're on the topic of long speeches and breaking wind, didn't the president give a speech of more than an hour yesterday concerning America's flailing economy? Yes, he did, but nobody cared . . . except for his much diminished cheerleading squad, consisting these days of little more than the editorial board of Gail's newspaper.

In an editorial entitled "The Middle Class at Center Stage" (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/25/opinion/the-middle-class-at-center-stage.html), The New York Times would have us believe:

"Washington is a city of sideshows, full of people who consider it their job to create distractions from the nation’s most serious problems. Politicians would rather argue about nonexistent scandals or plot to undermine each other’s programs than come up with ways to create jobs or elevate the hopes of the next generation.

President Obama needs to change the subject to have a successful final term, and he announced on Wednesday, in forceful terms, that he intends to do just that. In a speech in Galesburg, Ill., he said his highest priority for the next 1,276 days would be rebuilding a middle class that has been battered by globalization, technological change, and the concentration of wealth at the highest levels.

'Washington has taken its eye off the ball,' he said, 'and I am here to say this needs to stop.'"

Now which ball would that be? A golf ball?

But let's get serious for a moment.

Yesterday, before Obama's Galesburg speech, you had Jay Carney telling "Morning Joe" host Joe Scarborough (see: http://freebeacon.com/joe-scarborough-unleashes-on-jay-carney/):

"The president will go back to Galesburg, Illinois today to deliver a speech about where we need to move the economy, what we should be focusing on here in Washington. And it shouldn't be on the skirmishes that cause gridlock. It shouldn't be on the phony scandals that have consumed so much attention here, all to come to naught. It should be focused on what we can do to strengthen and grow the middle class."

And then finally there was the Galesburg speech itself, during which Obama declared:

"With an endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals, Washington’s taken its eye off the ball."

Hmm, "phony scandals" from Carney and Obama, "nonexistent scandals" from the Times. Do you smell a sound bite as opposed to economic repositioning?

I do. Unfortunately, the stench is also coming from The New York Times, which was once supposed to be a serious independent newspaper and not a "progressive" political mouthpiece.

IRS targeting of Obama's political opponents, the Benghazi cover-up and NSA overreaching? No "scandal" involving any of these little horrors. Let's roll up our sleeves, forget they ever happened, and get back to business.

Hope, Change and Forward! Four legs good, two legs bad!

Sickening.

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